CRA Asked for Help Against the Fight for Mortgage Fraud

Mortgage fraud is on the rise, with more people claiming to make more than they really do in order to qualify for bigger loans. In light of this, the CMHC is aiming for lenders to get access to mortgage applicants’ tax data so that they can identify those who might inflate their declared income in order to qualify under the new rules.

Fraud Detection – A Priority

CMHC released a statement saying that the current detection tools used by the mortgage industry are not at par with the level of fraud some people are resorting to, placing a limit on what fraud can be discovered or remain concealed.

The CMHC also shared via email that as of now, they do not know yet when the Canada Revenue Agency might help with the income verification although some industry experts predict that the cooperation between the CRA and CMHC could roll out in early October.

It is to be noted that CMHC is the largest mortgage insurer in Canada. In fact, they’ve insured 107,000 homes in just the first half of this year.

Rise in Mortgage Fraud

A 2017 study by Equifax states that mortgage fraud has risen 53% from what it was in 2013. This study did not specifically state the number of discovered fraud cases although a survey by the same firm found out that as much as 13% of Canadians would have no qualms about fudging their mortgage application.

Today’s stricter mortgage rules are fueling the fraud climate, making it more tempting for Canadians to lie on their mortgage application by inflating their income. For years, only a signed income form was required by some banks and what made it possible for contract workers and those who are self-employed to get a mortgage.

Better Verification Needed

Lenders accept printed income statements from the CRA website although they are reportedly easy to alter and cannot be verified because the CRA is not allowed to give access to a taxpayer’s information to any third party even when a written permission is granted by the taxpayer in question. This will change under the CMHC proposal because it would give direct access to the CRA data so lenders can verify the income information provided by borrowers. Not everyone agrees to this, as compared to the rest of the world, Canada’s mortgage delinquency rate is very low.

Mortgage brokers, such as CYR Funding owner Rena Malkah thinks that income verification should be left to underwriters and that a person’s credit rating is a better gauge of one’s financial status, adding that someone with a good credit rating is good at managing bills and paying them on time. Still, some mortgage professionals like Vine Group’s Peter Kinch thinks that now is the time for the CRA to be involved in income verification, adding that a similar system works well in the United States.

Are you needing help with verifying some information related to your mortgage business? Contact us to inquire about how our private investigation services can be of benefit to your business’ fraud prevention!

Laurentian Student Victimized by CRA Receive $600 from Kind Stranger

Do you know that more than a thousand Canadians have fallen victims for CRA scams last year? They’ve collectively lost over $4 million and the majority of scammers are still out there, victimizing even those who are struggling financially.

Unbelievable Turn of Events

A student in North Bay have fallen victim to the same telephone tax scam and faced a huge financial loss. Thankfully, a kind stranger heard of her ordeal and donated $600 to help her cope with her financial losses. The stranger gave her $600 just hours after she shared that fraudsters claiming to be from the Canada Revenue Agency were able to scam her out of money.

An Extraordinary Act of Kindness

Beverly, not her real name, the 29-year old student, was moved to tears as she shared how moved she was that someone who doesn’t know her at all would help her out in her time of need. She also expressed wanting to thank the donor in person.

The donor, who remains anonymous as Dan T, shared that he knows how it feels to fall victim to a phone scam, inferring that the donor was a victim of the same scam that targeted Beverly, if not some other type of fraud.

The Scam Story

Beverly, just like the other victims of the same scam, shared that the con started when she received a pre-recorded voicemail warning her that she is facing arrest. The digital voice claimed to be from the tax department of the Canada Revenue Agency and said that there is a lawsuit that they’ll be filing under Beverly’s name with a warrant for her arrest. She was told to call them back via a return phone number.

Beverly was aware of CRA fraud but said that she panicked and thought that the call was legitimate, especially after the call informed her that an officer will call to read her rights and another call that indicates that it is from the Ontario Provincial Police detachment flashed in her screen. She then pleaded to the person she thought was a police officer for about 3 hours to no avail. The caller then instructed her to pay $600 in Bitcoin currency to avoid getting arrested and facing a lawsuit. After she paid that, she was told that she needs to pay another $400 for court costs and officer’s fees. She then ended the conversation and called the police who informed her that she fell for a scam.

Canadians Beware!

It is to be noted that the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre reported that about 1,000 Canadians fell for the same type of scam in 2017, collectively losing about $4 million.

Though it is heartwarming to hear of news about people helping scam victims, we must not be side-tracked by the fact that Toronto phone scams are rampant and it will still be best to not fall victim to them. We must arm ourselves with knowledge, read up on scam news, and make sure to take the right steps forward once a phone scam is suspected. Contact us for private investigation services if you, or someone you know, needs help.

Protect Yourself From Mortgage Fraud and Real Estate Fraud

Mortgage fraud and real estate fraud are on the rise; and the frauds associated with them may take many different forms. As unsavoury as it is to think that these types of fraud happen around us, it is really of little wonder because fraudsters are opportunists and as such, they go for the biggest cons they can accomplish. Examples of the biggest heists in fraud are real estate fraud and mortgage fraud.

It is important to remember that the fraudsters behind mortgage fraud and real estate fraud are con artists who know how to use modern technology to their pull off their fraudulent schemes. They are able to do this because they know how the real estate process works and are able to spot loopholes that they can use against their victims.

Real Estate Title Fraud

Real estate title fraud is often made to look like a legitimate real estate deal by the fraudsters claiming that they now own the  target property because it was sold or gifted to them by the owner. The usual target here are seniors because it is more believable for a senior homeowner to sell or give their home away, aside from the fact that they usually have the largest assets which makes them attractive targets for fraudsters.

The thief obtains the land title of the victim’s home using a fake transfer document. The details in the document are usually compiled from information that were carelessly shared online (like posting photos of official documents on social media) or from a compiled database full of identity-theft data from target victims.

Mortgage Fraud

The title is then used to get a mortgage that the fraudster will never pay. The hapless homeowner is usually informed only when the home is near foreclosure. Imagine losing your home without knowing anything about an unpaid mortgage!

The average real estate fraud costs around $300,000. Nearly none of the fraudsters involved in schemes like this are ever caught and the homeowners are the ones who are left to cope with the aftermath.

How to Prevent Mortgage Fraud and Real Estate Fraud

People who have access to your personal information may use what they know about you to target you for fraud. The first step towards protecting yourself from being a target for fraud is to restrict what personal information you share publicly and limit who can access your information in the real world.

The above means doing all that you can to prevent identity theft and not being too trusting of neighbours, friends, caretakers, or even distant relatives. Your mail, bank statements, deeds and titles, insurance information, and all financial details must be kept where only you or a person you trust can access. This also means not giving away sensitive information over the phone (some fraudsters will pretend to be from the bank), not writing down your credit card details where unauthorized people may see them, and destroying mail before throwing it in the trash; basically following all the sensible steps to avoid fraud.

If you need a private investigator to check your vulnerability to identity theft, mortgage fraud, and real estate fraud, our private investigation services can assess your risk factors and help you address them. Contact Haywood Hunt today!

 

Trump Tower in Vancouver Now Part of the CRA Probe Into Pre-Sale Condo Flippers

The Canadian government is widening their ever reaching grasp and going after all sorts of tax cheats including those who are in the real estate market. The developers of Trump Tower in Vancouver, the huge project at Wall Centre Central Park, are in hot water.

No less than the Minister of National Revenue himself went to the Federal Court of Canada to gather information from the developers regarding pre-sale condo buyers who got their contracts before the construction was completed. Just last July 19, the Canadian government filed 3 more applications to get further information on the pre-sale flippers in Vancouver. None of the companies involved in this fiasco have so far responded for the media’s requests for comments so far.

Tax Evaders Beware

The Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) is going after all forms of tax evaders and not just focusing on developers. In view of this, a showdown is scheduled in October 2018 between a group of taxpayers and the government. The taxpayers in question argue that their Constitutional rights have been trampled by the actions that the CRA are taking to identify tax evaders. A 2-day hearing is scheduled to hear out both camps, focusing on the offshore tax compliance investigations which brought out the conflict.

The Minister of National Revenue says that audit techniques shouldn’t be disclosed. He says that the audit techniques and methods developed by and used by the CRA should be protected so as to not give away information that those who don’t wish to pay the right taxes can use.

 

Locked for Secrecy

Both sides want to keep their information and details private. The CRA wishes to keep their methods out of public information while the involved individuals do not want to give access to the details of their financial transactions both in Canada and abroad.

The CRA is currently doing all that it can to avoid further losses in revenue. In 2014, it is estimated that the agency lost between $0.8 billion and $3 billion in revenues from offshore investment incomes, after checking the numbers in that year and seeing that they are not lining up. In 2014, $13.2 billion was reported in capital gains, $9 billion in foreign income, and $429 billion was reported by corporations, trusts, and individuals in offshore assets. Furthermore, investigations for the taxes between 2014 and 2017 revealed that about $1 billion in additional income should have come from international focused audits and yet was not paid to the CRA. This resulted in more audits and reassessments which just uncovered more lapses.

Ongoing Investigations

Although the minister’s office did not give out an official interview, the agency did share that there are currently 260 ongoing investigations 50 of which are with offshore financial structure involvement. The number is still increasing.

Tax fraud isn’t just about CRA scams from people claiming to be from the CRA and telling people that they owe the CRA money. The ‘big fish’ tax fraud doesn’t just commit fraud against ‘small-fry’ victims, some of them are so bold that they decide to game the government and be big-time tax evaders.

Need help with investigating something that doesn’t seem like the whole truth? Contact us at Haywood Hunt if you need help from private investigators!

$13M Fraud Case Got Charges Stayed Because There was No Judge for a Trial

Imagine being a victim of fraud, finding out who the alleged culprits are, gearing up for a trial, and then hearing that the charges have been stayed because there was no judge available for the trial to take place. That is exactly what happened in a recent case wherein Superior Court Justice Bonnie Croll had to stay the charges for the 12-week trial due in Toronto because no judge is available until January to preside over the trial.

Are Heavy Caseloads Burdening In Our Justice System?

The decision came after finding out that the trial won’t be able to commence in a timely manner because there was simply no judge available for proceedings to take place. In fact, there are 16 judicial vacancies at present time. In a related news, there is a possibility that other criminal cases that are lined up in the federal justice system may be dismissed unless more judges are appointed soon.

Office of the chief justice of the Superior Court senior counsel Norrie Nathanson shared that there are significant concerns about the courts’ ability to keep up with the cases, more so in view of the 2016 landmark decision in the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision regarding R v. Jordan which says that strict timelines must be implemented in the processing of criminal cases, 30 months in Superior Court and 18 months in provincial court.

It should be noted that judicial vacancies are a real challenge more so for courts that are the size of Ontario’s Superior Court of Justice. It takes a real effort from the judicial advisory committees and the Minister of Justice to ensure that appointments are made right after a judicial vacancy is known.

 

Regarding the Jordan case, it states that proceedings should follow the timeframe as to not breach a person’s right to be tried within a reasonable time. Failure to do so would be a violation of a person’s constitutional right unless the court can prove that the delay was caused by exceptional reasons.

Why the Charges Were Stayed

Croll shared in her ruling that courts must be properly resourced with judges  and the charges are to be stayed because the resources needed for the trial to take place cannot be provided by the court. The delay that the case was facing was considered unreasonable.

As many as 28 judicial vacancies might be what’s in store for September if no appointments are made soon. That is a vacancy of about 10%. It doesn’t help that the federal process for appointing new judges is known to be slow.

For a new judge to be appointed, the process starts with the judicial advisory committee that will screen applicants. Applicants will be appointed after a federal cabinet meeting and after the governor-general or her designate signs the appointment.

What we can learn from this is that it is now more important to file charges as soon as possible to ensure that your case will be designated to a judge as soon as possible. Another thing to note is that a stay doesn’t mean that charges are dropped, but they will have to be refiled within a year to try to get to trial. This is different to the dropping of charges wherein the accused party can’t be brought to court for the same case again.

Need help building a strong case? You need facts! Contact us at HaywoodHunt to uncover information that can help you win your case. Our private investigation services cover a wide range of private eye products to combat fraud.

13 Month Fraud Term Given to Former Olympian

It looks like fraud is really making a big impact on everyone these days, with more people getting involved in fraud with or without their own doing. It seems like no matter how many tips to avoid fraud you know about, fraudsters will find a way to make you a fraud victim.

Silent Sentencing

The above is true in the case of former Olympian Harold Backer who was charged with fraud over $5,000 after pleading guilty to the charges against him. No word was shared why he went mysteriously missing for 18 months though it led to an international police search.

Backer’s lawyer, Joven Narwal spoke for him in the court because the former Olympian opted not to speak a word. His lawyer said that Backer, 55, is extremely sorry about his conduct and has nothing to say.

Olympian Turned Fraudster?

Backer graduated from Princeton University and has been in the Olympics thrice. He was charged with 2 counts of fraud over $5,000. He initially pleaded not guilty to the charges but changed his plea to guilty for a single charge of fraud over $5,000. He was also given 3 years of probation by Judge Carmen Rogers and he agreed to pay a restitution amounting to $161,900 to 5 individuals. He was observed to be quite emotional during his sentencing, hugging his children and his brother prior to being led to court.

What Happened?

Backer went missing after telling his family that he will be going for a bike ride on the 3rd of November 2015. He turned himself in in April 2017 to Victoria police and had not touched the topic of where he has been for the year and a half that he’s been missing.

During the sentencing, no word of Mr. Backer’s was mentioned and the Counsel specifically said that they are only concerned about what happened between May 2013 and November 2015 as this was the time frame wherein Backer committed his offences. Defence lawyer Joven Narwal said that his client’s disappearance has nothing to do with his offences. Victoria police stated that they are offering no comment regarding the disappearance either.

Soon after Backer’s disappearance, an officer said he spotted a man fitting Backer’s description getting into a ferry, taking a 90-minute trip. At around the same time, financial crime investigators began looking into Harold Backer and his company My Financial Backer Corp. after his investors received concerning letters.

His lawyer said that Backer never intended to defraud his investors and that he cared deeply for them. It was a matter of investments not performing as he hoped they would and he felt that he let down a lot of people.

With doctors and even military officials getting involved in fraud, it is not a huge surprise that a former Olympian was too, no matter what the intentions are. What matters is to arm yourself with knowledge regarding fraud in Canada so you can take the necessary steps to protect yourself against fraud. Another is to be proactive in dealing with fraud by hiring a private investigator to help you get to the truth. Contact us if you need to consult professionals about handling fraud.

Canada’s Longest Fraud Sentence Handed to Financial Predator Daniel Reeve

A sentence of 14 years in person for fraud was recently handed to Daniel P. Reeve for defrauding 41 vulnerable individuals out of about $10 million – the harshest and longest fraud-related prison sentence to date given in Canada.

Justice Served

The verdict was given by Justice Toni Skarica to former Waterloo Region financial adviser Daniel P. Reeve, who’ve fleeced more than 40 individuals who have little to no investing experience out of their hard-earned $10 million. The justice reportedly said that if it was legally possible to give a longer sentence, it would have been done for this case, indirectly saying that even 14 years (the longest fraud sentence ever served in Canada) is still not enough.

Reeve still has 4 years to serve as the 6 years he served in pretrial custody was credited as 10 years prison time. He is facing another 10 year jail time if he is not able to pay back the 10 million fine within 10 years of being out the prison. The fine will go to his victims. Reeve, who is now 58, claims to be broke.

Preying on the Vulnerable

What made Reeve’s actions more despicable is that he seemed to target the vulnerable. Justice Skarica shared that one of the victims was a then recently widowed woman who Reeve promised to assist in hard times but ended up swindling out of her personal savings and her husband’s RRSP.

Many of Reeve’s victims lost everything as a consequence of listening to him. Some were not able to pay their mortgage, some got depressed, some even divorced because of the strain of financial difficulties.

Justice Skarica said that Reeve sought out grieving spouses, the elderly, the disabled, loyal clients, the emotionally vulnerable, strangers, and even his close friends to be victims in his scheme. The justice likened Reeve’s actions to that of a predator, as he hunted down those who can easily fall victim to him.

A Clear Warning

14 years for fraud is more time than some murderers spend in prison. Crown prosecutor Fraser McCracken shared that Reeve’s prison sentence is without a doubt, the longest one for fraud in Canada. He hopes that this will shed light on the plight of those who fall victim and serve as a warning to all those who wish to commit fraud.

Reeve’s predatory scheme is a mix of Ponzi schemes and scams, according to justice Skarica. Reeve did it to fund his lavish lifestyle and boost his ego. Reeve reportedly often used a stretch limo while serving as DRP Financial Inc’s ‘chief visionary officer’. He also reportedly owned a Porsche Boxster, 2 Cadillac Escalades, a Jaquar Land Rover, and expensive suits all while living in a lavish farmhouse. He was able to pull off his scams while still offering financial advice despite losing his financial adviser licence in 2007.

Reeve showed no emotion upon hearing of the havoc his actions brought to the lives of his victims. He apologized but did not show remorse.

Fraud victims are in the thousands per year in the Greater Toronto Area alone. Exposing fraudsters and getting help from authorities isn’t as easy as well because you’ll have to be certain that fraud exists. If you need help uncovering fraud or exploring what you can do to protect yourself, don’t hesitate to contact us for an obligation-free initial consultation.

Stay Safe from Fraud While Traveling with These 8 Tips

Travelers are often targeted for fraud, from booking airline and hotel tickets, to being defrauded on the ground. One of the biggest issues with travel fraud is identity theft. It is no secret that websites store personal information and those with enough know-how can easily access them. Identity theft can occur in a variety of ways and can create years of torment once dishonest individuals have your data. Below are the ways you can protect your information while traveling.

Refrain from sharing your itinerary or location in social media

Statistics say that less than a third of all travelers refrain from posting their travel details while traveling. The danger in this is that thieves and stalkers will know where you are and what you are up to. If you must share, do it after.

Don’t use public WiFi

Some hackers are always logged-on to public WiFi and just waiting for a chance to hack into your device and steal your data. If you must use public WiFi, then avoid logging in to your bank account or other financial accounts. Better yet, purchase a local sim card and create your own hotspot!

Bring only the absolute essentials and keep other valuables in a safe place

Why bring your social security card, driver’s license, and birth certificate when traveling? Just bring your passport and one or two credit cards. Leave the rest in a safe place at home.

Activate tracking tools on your phone and add a password

Think about it, a thief will easily have access to your most personal information and photos and videos if your phone gets stolen, so make it a bit harder for thieves to access your personal phone data by adding a password. If your phone has a tracking feature or a feature that will allow you to erase everything on the device remotely, be sure to turn that on too to be on the safe side.

Know exactly what important things you brought with you

Keep a list of the cards and documents you brought so you’d know exactly what to protect and who to call if your phone, wallet, or luggage gets stolen or goes missing. Remember that when it comes to preventing identity theft and use of your credit cards, your prompt action is a key factor!

Keep your home safe while you’re away

Stop your mail delivery to prevent an overflowing mailbox and schedule a time for trusted persons to maintain your lawn or check into your house. Basically you want it to look like you didn’t leave especially if you’ll be away for weeks.

Keep a close eye on your bank and credit card reports

Thieves who got your data can get away with plundering your money because you weren’t fast enough to know what they were up to. By monitoring financial transactions, you’ll know exactly when your account has been compromised if it does happen.

Avoid being a walking target

When you’re away, dishonest people can scam your relatives asking for money claiming to be you, all because you’ve made yourself and your loved ones a target for fraud. If bad people know where you are, they can use that information to steal from your loved ones by pretending to be you stuck abroad and can’t access your own account. Your elderly relatives are particularly targeted for this type of scam because they’ll surely send ‘help’ as soon as they can, not knowing that they’re just being taken for a ride.

With majority of victims (55%) saying that it took more than a year to reclaim their stolen identity, it pays to be extra careful when traveling. If you think that your details may have been compromised, contact us to discuss what actions we can help you with using our personal investigation services.

 

Personal Injury Law Firm Accused of Filing Fraudulent Accident Claims

Over $1.5M of false benefits, this is what the TTC is trying to claim from a Scarborough personal injury law firm after the law firm allegedly doctored the benefit claims of streetcar and bus collision victims.

Fraud Uncovered?

TTC accused a law firm for falsifying records so that they can claim payments for housekeeping, home care, and other services that were never rendered to the accident victims. The TTC, together with their in-house insurance company stated their claim on January 24, 2017 against the law firm of Meleni David for allegedly falsifying records to claim fake expenses.

The law firm filed their defence in April 2017 with the company, David herself, and an employee as co-defendant stating that they deny engaging in unlawful scheme and added that TTC’s claims are excessive, exaggerated, and remote; therefore the court should dismiss the case.

TTC Fires Back

The TTC allegedly found evidence that fraudulent claims were connected to 13 of the firm’s clients who got into accidents between 2005 and 2014. TTC shared that they made a total of $654,553 in payments for the clients but did not share the exact amount involved in the fraud.

TTC stated in their claim that they grew suspicious in 2015 when they found fake documents in a claim handled by Meleni David’s law firm, a law firm that advertises TTC Accident as a key area of their practice.

In relation to the above, a former legal assistant at David’s firm admitted to forging signatures on invoices for home care services for an accident victim though the legal assistant stated that David wasn’t aware of what he did. The same legal assistant is also being sued by the TTC but he denied involvement in other false claims and also denied involvement in the scheme uncovered by TTC. David’s statement of defence stated that she fired the assistant as soon as she discovered the forged signatures and inappropriate handling of invoices.

Was There Fraud?

The TTC says that their discovery of the inconsistencies in the file is what lead to their in-house insurance provider’s review of the other claims handled by David’s law firm. After their review, the TTC allegedly found demonstrably forged invoices in more than half of the files they’ve audited prompting then to charge the law firm for scamming them by making claimants sign blank invoice forms for expenses such as home care, housekeeping, and other services. The invoices were then signed by fabricated suppliers and service providers and then submitted to TTC’s insurance company to claim reimbursement.

The TTC also shared that further investigation lead to them finding out that the victims did not receive the services that were allegedly rendered to them. This case is currently undergoing litigation with no set date for a trial.

Do you suspect fraud at work or fraud at your business? We can get you answers. Contact us for our private investigation services and we’ll get back to you asap regarding how we can be of best assistance to you.

Toronto Immigration Consultant Receives a 7-Year Jail Sentence for Fraud

Immigration consultant Angelina Codina was given a 7-year jail sentence when she was convicted of fraud for scamming thousands of dollars from former clients. The court also ordered her to pay back the $30,000 she got from her former clients.

Immigration Fraud

Angelina Codina targeted folks in Canada who were trying to get their relatives in the country. The clients paid Codina thousands of dollars over a period of 3 years for her assistance in helping their relatives immigrate to Canada. It was soon uncovered that she was running a fraudulent immigration scheme and was defrauding multiple clients.

Convicted for Fraud

60 year old Angelina Codina from Toronto was found guilty of 5 offences under the November 2017 Federal Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. She’s due to serve another 5 years considering the time she already served in custody. She was also ordered to pay more than $30,000 to 4 former clients that she allegedly defrauded for money. She is planning to appeal the sentence given to her.

Angelina Codina was convicted of 1 count of misrepresenting facts on an immigration application and 4 counts of advising clients on immigration matters without proper authorization. The Crown stated that Codina acted as a fraudulent immigration consultant and willfully targeted 10 vulnerable individuals between September 2011 and January 2014, making false promises to said individuals that she’ll be able to get their relatives in Canada.

The Ontario Superior Court was asked by Crown prosecutor Lynda Trefler to fine Codina $100,000 and to sentence her to 11 years in prison aside from paying her victims $30,200 each as restitution. This in view of the maximum 3 years penalty for lying on an immigration application and 2 years maximum punishment for unlawfully advising people on immigration matters. Trefler also voiced out that Codina’s behaviour has impacted both immigration and society aside from her victims.

Timely Arrest

Codina was arrested 4 years ago in May 2014 by Canada Border Services Agency. She has represented herself during the trial despite having been disbarred in 2002 and insisted on her innocence for all counts filed against her. She has records for swindling people in the past.

Codina was convicted of fraud and falsification of documents for stealing $20,000 from Ontario’s legal aid plan in 1997. The Law Society of Upper Canada disbarred her in 2002. She also has records for conviction of grand larceny in 2000 for practicing law without a license in New York, USA and providing attorney services to 11 paying clients from 1996 to 1999 through fraudulent law firm Codina Partners International in NYC. She was released for this in November 2009 although her sentence was an aggregate term of 5 to 15 years imprisonment.

Codina maintains innocence about her immigration fraud charges and says she was only acting as a conduit between her clients and immigration lawyers, even after multiple cases filed against her in small claims court.

Foreigners and immigrants are usually targeted for scams in Canada because they are perceived to be easy pickings for scammers. It pays to be updated and know how to protect yourself against scams. If something is too good to be true, you may consult with private investigators like us to get the real deal on the truth and know more tips to avoid fraud. Contact us today!