COVID-19 Insurance Scams to Watch Out For

COVID-19 scams are on the rise, including insurance scams. Although most of the country is either social distancing or are on lockdown, the fraud-fighting community is seeing a rise in the number of insurance fraud cases. The rise is very noticeable and is enough to prompt organizations to issue alerts for their consumers.

Playing with Vulnerabilities

As we face a health crisis, people are understandably more anxious and fearful regarding what the future may hold for them. Add to this the fact that a pandemic brings in a set of problems that institutions are not ready for, and it is easy to see how criminals would see the situation as an opportunity to commit fraud.

How does one recognize if something is fraudulent, then? National Insurance Crime Bureau Senior Vice President James Schweitzer says that if something sounds too good to be true, then something might be afoot. He adds that scammers are targeting people by appealing to the inherent desire for information and hope. Scammers send emails and post ads on social media that appeal to this human need and then ask for personal information such as Social Security Number, credit card information, and similar sensitive data. Victims may then get their identity stolen from them or used for illegal activities. Below are other COVID-19 scams to watch out for.

COVID-19 Insurance Scam

Bogus insurance agents are trying to mimic mainstream and legitimate companies and pitching to sell COVID-19 insurance. The Coalition Against Insurance Fraud urges people not to follow their links or entertain their calls as there is no insurance product that covers COVID-19 problems the way they are marketing it.

COVID-19 Car Insurance Scam

Even with minimal vehicles on the streets, scammers will find a way to purposely cause accidents to be able to file a claim against their own insurance or a target’s insurance. These staged accidents work for car insurance scam because social distancing means fewer witnesses as well as people not taking a closer look at fake injuries to avoid a possible infection with COVID-19.

COVID-19 Travel Insurance Scam

There is a proliferation of bogus travel insurance policies that claim coverage for trip cancellations related to COVID-19. Note that most travel insurance policies have no coverage for pandemics, so a COVID-19 coverage is an immediate red flag. A Cancel for Any Reason coverage or a CFAR is most often just a sales pitch and had to be purchased separately within strict limitations.

COVID-19 Phishing Scam or Spoofing Scam

Unsolicited emails that look like they are from legitimate companies and requesting for personal information are most likely bogus. So are messages from companies who claim to have access to cures, ventilators, COVID-19 diagnostic kits, and the like. It is best to not fill out any forms from such messages and to simply mark the message as spam.

Fraud is truly on the rise these days. It pays to be extra careful and read up on ongoing scams particularly the ones that the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre warned about aside from the COVID-19 scams above. Exercise extra prudence more so with unsolicited communication too. If you think that you have been scammed or has been targeted by scammers, contact us to inquire about the ways that our private investigators can help you protect yourself using our private investigation services.

 

Millions of Coronavirus Scam Emails Are Being Blocked by Google Everyday

Google has been actively fighting off scam emails related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the latest report says the tech giant is blocking around 100 million coronavirus scam emails per day. The coronavirus emails are phishing attacks launched by scammers to collect data such as personal information from unsuspecting individuals. After collecting the information, the information will be used to hack accounts or to steal identities to commit more fraud.

Explosion of Phishing Attacks

Criminals are getting more creative and can even send emails that may seem like regular emails from banks, government offices, and billing companies. The latest scam email trend is to use the coronavirus pandemic as the email’s header to get people to click on an email and provide the information the scammers are looking for in order to commit fraud. It is estimated that there could be hundreds of millions of scam emails per day and Google is able to filter or block 100 million per day to protect the 1.5 billion people who are users of Gmail service.

Impersonation of the World Health Organization

What is particularly alarming is how the phishing emails would impersonate authorities and health agencies. A huge number of such emails are impersonating the World Health Organization to persuade people to donate to bogus causes or to download malware. Some emails sent by the cyber criminals imitate government institutions to capitalize on government support packages.

The Fight Against Fraudulent Email

Google is currently using their machine learning tools to block coronavirus phishing emails and they’ve been successful at blocking more than 99.9% of the emails from reaching their users. With this said, the emails are still around and increased significantly. In fact, several cyber security companies are currently looking into this and report that they’ve seen a 667% increase in phishing emails since the pandemic started.

Exploitation of Legitimate Fears and Concerns

Fraudulent emails could be from anywhere. There are some that are pretending to be from the UK government, some from those who are pretending to be from the CDC or Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, some that claim to be from specific politicians or world leaders, and some that claim to be from the World Health Organization. A rule of thumb for ignoring such emails is that if you are not signed up for an email service from a specific sender, then it is unlikely that they would have your contact details to send you emails.

No matter how important an email sounds like, if it is asking you to provide personal information, to download something on your device, or to log-in at an app or a website that you haven’t heard of, simply report the email as fraud and do not open any links on it. Remember that cyber criminals are banking on confusion, fear, and other emotional responses to try to get people to do what they want when they are most vulnerable.

Have you provided your information to a possible phishing email or downloaded a fake COVID-19 tracker app? Contact us today and we may be able to assist you to protect yourself with the help of our private investigation services. Not only can we help you avoid phishing scams in the future, but we can look at your internet fraud vulnerability and provide you with steps to protect yourself.

Spotting Phishing Scams Related to COVID-19

Not even an economy-stopping pandemic will stop fraudsters. As more nations feel the grip of the increasing health crisis, scammers are taking full advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic to send fake emails to people tricking hapless victims into clicking on malicious links or attachments and revealing their personal information.

COVID-19 Cyber Security Scam Alert

A COVID-19 phishing email looks like a normal email complete with authentic-looking logos and branding. They often use the World Health Organization’s branding or logos or use the same from other public or government health agencies. Know that phishing is not limited to email, as some fraudsters resort to calling Canadian homes with offers of fake laboratory testing or fraudulent requests for donations.

How to Avoid a COVID-19 Scam

Scammers will send emails that will attempt to get your personal information or install malware into your mobile device or computer. Some will look like a donation link designed to capture your credit card information. Take the following steps to avoid becoming a victim.

  • Practice skepticism. No matter how authentic looking an email may be, try to be more skeptic and nitpick details in the email. If the email contains email addresses, toll-free numbers, or website links, you can double check by using a known email address, website, or email of the organization to avoid clicking on fake links and contacting the scammers directly. If you want to verify some information, know that the right information will be posted on your provincial health agency’s website or the Public Health Agency of Canada website.
  • Always check the email address of the sender. Phishing emails use sender addresses or names that may look like the real thing, but if you hover on the sender’s name, the actual email doesn’t match the sender at all.
  • Avoid clicking on attachments or links. Embedded links in phishing emails seem valid, but the address it links to is definitely not. If the link address seems suspicious or does not seem connected to the highlighted text, there is a big possibility that it is a phishing email. If there are any attachments that aren’t expected or seem out of place, it might be infected with malware.
  • Be more vigilant. If an email is requesting for your financial information or personal data, that may be fake.
  • Make sure that your devices are protected. Installing anti-spam, anti-malware, anti-virus, and anti-spyware software can seem like being too cautious but you’ll be happy that you have them for protection in case of a possible attack.

What to do with a Phishing Email

You can’t avoid receiving phishing emails because they are everywhere. What you can do is either report them or delete/block them. You can report the email to the organization being spoofed so that they can issue the necessary warnings for other people. By blocking or deleting the email, you can save yourself some wasted time and headache down the road.

Aside from checking the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre for a compiled list of COVID-19 scams, you can stay tuned in this blog for more news on COVID-19 fraud. You can also check the government of Canada approved information regarding COVID-19 at https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection.html. If you think that you may have been a victim of phishing or identity theft, do not hesitate to contact us. Our private investigators can help you with the necessary steps to protect yourself against phishing scams as well as gather data that you may need for an official police report using our private investigation services.

Brampton Man Arrested After Faking COVID-19 to Get Out of Work

A Brampton man faked having COVID-19 in order to get out of work. He has been charged after he falsely claimed contact with someone infected with the novel coronavirus earlier this week.

The Man Who Cried Corona

Peel police was contacted by a Brampton business owner around 9:15 a.m. Monday following an immediate shutdown after an employee claimed contact with a family member who is positive with COVID-19. After careful investigation, officers found out that the claim was a hoax orchestrated by the man to get off of work. To be clear, there is no one from the man’s family who was sick with the novel coronavirus or was exposed to it.

The Brampton man is 39-years-old and works at a small business. He was charged with public mischief and released on the promise that he will appear at a later scheduled date in a Brampton court.

More Fake COVID-19 Cases

This is not the first case of someone pretending to have COVID-19. A McDonald’s worker in Hamilton was charged after a fake positive COVID-19 test less than a week ago. Just last Friday, the 18-year-old woman faked a doctor’s note stating a confirmed positive COVID-19 result to not have to work at McDonald’s for her shift. The restaurant had to shut down as a result and people were also made to worry needlessly. She was charged with fraud under $5,000 as she made and used a forged document as well as mischief over $5,000 for causing the restaurant to shutdown operations.

Warning Against Faking a Coronavirus Infection

The world is facing serious health and economic threats from having to shutdown places in relation to the spread of COVID-19 infection. Once a person is suspected of having it, an immediate tracing of people he/she came in contact it will be done, using up already strained government resources. Places that he/she frequented will be disinfected and possibly shut down, causing a substantial loss in revenue plus spread of fear, panic, and worry.

The damages of a fake positive COVID-19 infection go beyond just money. A case of COVID-19 should not be treated as a joke as there are people who place their lives in danger and have lost their lives in the fight against it. It is not worth it to lose one’s job and face serious legal consequences just to get out of work for a day or a few days by faking a novel coronavirus infection.

Beware of Fake COVID-19 Claims

If you have heard that someone you know may be infected with COVID-19, it is best to stay calm and verify the information. Contacting the local authorities will help as well. If you know of any information that are related to the cases above, kindly contact 22 Division at 905-453-2121 ext.1233. Should you wish to leave information anonymously, contact Peel Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Are you a business owner who quickly needs to verify a claim of COVID-19 infection by your staff? Contact us at Haywood Hunt and we’ll see how we can help you avoid falling for fraud and possible COVID-19 scams with the use of our private investigation services.

 

Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre Warns of the Following Covid-19 Scams

Covid-19 seems to be everywhere and so are fraud attempts and scams that are related to it. It isn’t new that fraudsters typically take advantage of times when people are confused to create more mayhem and cash-in from fear. Creative fraudsters do not care about what happens tomorrow, they only care about benefitting themselves and will exploit any avenue to do so, even the outbreak of Covid-19.

Covid-19 Scams

The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre and local police departments are warning people about the rise of fraudulent activity, particularly those that are related to Covid-19 which are spreading faster than the virus itself. The warning talks about fraudsters profiteering from consumer’s uncertainties, misinformation, and fears. Below is a list of Covid-19 related scams to watch out for.

Quick Covid-19 Tests

Note that testing for Covid-19 is only done by hospitals because they are the only ones authorized to do so. Beware of fake kits and swabbing procedures that are being sold for a premium.

Essential Products Hoarding and Selling

This activity has many faces. Some consumers have hoarded essential products to sell later at a much-inflated cost. Some people are taking advantage of consumers who are stocking up by knowingly selling fraudulent or expired products at a bargain. There are people selling products that they claim can ward off the virus or provide a miracle cure. Even U.S. Federal agencies have warned the public about this and government agencies are clarifying that no such product exists yet.  And lastly, some scam artists create ads selling products that do not exist and they do not intend to send once payment has been made. It is best to be wary of products that are priced too high or too low or are promising results that are too good to be true.

Fake Anti-Covid-19 Filters and Cleaning Services

Believe it or not, some scheming heating and cleaning companies came up with fake services that offer Covid-19 filters and other similar claims just to drum up business.

Fake Calls About Hydro/Power Disconnection

Fraudulent individuals started making calls to people claiming their hydro or power could be disconnected if they do not pay them or agree to a special deal, claiming that the victim is behind with his/her bills.

Fraudulent CDC and WHO People

The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will never offer to sell access to a list of infected people nor offer tests for sale.

False Calls from Public Health Agency of Canada

Fraudsters are pretending to be from Public Health Agency of Canada and calling people to tell them that they’ve tested positive for Covid-19; and that to get access to a prescription and treatment, they will have to comply with providing their credit card and health card numbers.

Phishing Emails from Fake Government Agencies

Some scam artists are sending phishing emails that look like they are from government agencies. The emails are asking for personal details such as financial details and other sensitive data.

This list just contains some of the most common scams that are related to Covid-19. Know that anything that could be too good to be true and cannot be verified through reliable sources are likely to be scams or misinformation. If you’ve fallen victim to what you think may be a Covid-19 scam, be sure to report to the proper authorities. You may also contact us at Haywood Hunt to avail of our private investigation services. We can help you verify information and help you put up safeguards against scams, Covid-19 related or not.

 

Prevent Yourself from Falling Victim to Mortgage Fraud

Real estate fraud has been seeing an increase in incidences lately. Be it title fraud or mortgage fraud, it seems that more people are falling victim to real estate fraud and it’s about time people arm themselves with information for better awareness.

What is Mortgage Fraud?

Mortgage fraud is when a person intentionally provides incomplete or fake information to a lender to be granted a mortgage that the person may not otherwise qualify for. It can be committed by someone by falsifying appraisal of a property or by claiming to have higher income than what is the reality.

What is Title Fraud?

Title fraud is committed when someone else poses as the homeowner and tries to sell the home or to get a mortgage using a fake title. Basically, entering into any transaction using false identity and/or false title is title fraud.

Real Estate Fraud in Canada       

Mortgage fraud and title fraud are crimes that affect the banking industry, government, and law enforcement. Although there is no central organization that records or collects data nationally, real estate fraud in Canada is taken very seriously by the sectors involved. Note that the majority of the hundreds of billions of dollars in mortgage value across Canada are normal but still, this has taken the attention of involved sectors and measures are being taken to prevent real estate fraud as well as protect people from falling victim to it.

Protection from Real Estate Fraud

Banks are constantly working to protect people against all types of fraud. Most banks have security teams that are working 24/7 enhancing security, upgrading technology, and implementing plans to prevent fraud from occurring. The security teams also keep a record of data to assist the police with investigations if ever criminal activity is detected. Aside from this, banks work together with the Canadian Bankers Association to combat real estate fraud across the country and have task forces cooperating with the government, real estate groups, the police, private investigators, lenders, and lawyers in order to find out how real estate fraud cases can be prevented so that Canadians can be more protected against it.

Protecting Yourself from Real Estate Fraud

The good news is that you can do so much to protect yourself against this type of fraud by implementing the following:

  • Guard your personal information and do not disclose them over the phone, email, or to people you do not know.
  • Check your billing information and mail. Be sure to follow up if certain mails stop arriving.
  • Make sure items that carry your personal information are kept safe or if needing to be disposed, destroyed to render your information not readable.
  • Check your credit report for discrepancies.
  • Ensure that your home is in your name by checking the registry.

Do not worry about how banks are protecting themselves because they have private investigators to help safeguard their processes and data. Focus on how you can protect yourself from fraud and the actions that you can do if you suspect that you’ve fallen victim for one. If you need help uncovering information, feel free to contact us to avail of our private investigation services. We can do more than just investigate at Haywood Hunt, we can also help you initiate practices and put up protective barriers so that you can prevent yourself from falling victim to mortgage fraud.

Two Oakville Men Accused of Take-Over Fraud

Two men from Oakville are currently facing charges of fraud and forging documents related to taking over ownership of an Etobicoke bakery. The two men allegedly did not pay but ended up getting ownership of the bakery through fraud.

What the Police Says

According to Toronto police, the two men approached the owners of the 36,000 square-foot bakery in Etobicoke and agreed to buy the building for a certain amount. The men, operators of Easton Pharmaceuticals, are alleged by the police to have no intention to pay and was found out to have altered attorney letters to make it look like they are truly buying the building. The men failed to transfer the payment after the ownership was transferred.

51-year-old Vincent DeMasi of Toronto and 49-year-old Evangelos Karayannopoulos of Oakville were arrested and charged in late October 2019 for fraud and forging documents. According to the police, Evangelos Karayannopoulos also goes by the name Evan Kerras.

Easton Pharmaceuticals is based in Toronto and describes itself as a specialty pharmaceutical company on its website. The company claims it developed and owned FDA-approved drugs for wound healing previously. Current stocks are traded on OTC Pink exchange. The company’s trading rights have been suspended by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on November 20, 2019.

Caught Off-Guard

Both DeMasi and Karayannopoulos claim to have been caught off-guard by the charges against them, according to an email addressed to the Star. Karayannopoulos claims that their legal counsel has no knowledge of any request for information by the Toronto Police and was equally appalled and shocked about the charges and allegations against DeMasi and Karayannopoulos. He further said that the true victims will be revealed after investigation and that those responsible will be held accountable for their actions.

How Events Unfolded

Easton Pharmaceuticals announced in April 2019 that they’ve acquired the bakery, Supreme Sweets Inc. and called it a strategic acquisition for Easton so that the company can enter the Cannabis Edibles market to create premium Cannabis Edibles for various needs. The property is located in Brockhouse Rd. in Etobicoke.

In a suspension order issued in November 19, 2019, The SEC found that there are questions regarding the adequacy and accuracy of the information about the company’s recent public announcements about the acquisition as well as about the company’s operations, specifically the press release dated April 24, 2019 which stated that Easton Pharmaceuticals completed its acquisition of Supreme Sweets Inc. In summary, there are a lot of data and claims that do not match up, including claims of operating fully functional video slot games for release to American Casinos in the near future.

High-Value Fraud

Police are worried that there might be more victims. Toronto Police’s Financial Crime Unit found out about the high-value fraud, with DeMasi and Karayannopoulos taking possession of a 36,000 square foot building along with about $9 million worth of industrial machinery without having a single cent exchanged on the closing date. Toronto Const. Victor Wong urges anyone with information to call the police at 416-808-7373.

Were you or anyone you know a victim of business fraud? Let our private investigation services help you! Contact us at Haywood Hunt and schedule an obligation-free consultation to find out what we can do for you.

 

 

 

Canadians Lost $22.5M in Romance Fraud for 2019

The number one scam in Canada in 2019 was romance scam, with Canadians losing more than $22 million to it. The numbers for 2019 have not fully been tallied, so the number is likely larger than this.

Even Women Are Victims

When talking about online romance fraud, the common misconception is that it only happens between an older male victim from a richer country and a younger attractive girl from some other part of the world. The truth is that many women fall for romance scam fraudsters too. Michelle Boyer of Ottawa sent more than $3,000 in money transfers over the course of 10 months to a man she met online who used to send her romantic poems. The poems turned out to be from a poetry website.

According to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre or CAFC, romance scams currently surpass all other forms of fraud in Canada in terms of money lost. The numbers may look like a lot, but authorities believe that less than 5% of victims talk about getting scammed.

What Are Romance Scams?

Romance scams are when some bad people with false romantic intentions attempt to make someone else trust and confide to them in order to get access to the victim’s money, bank accounts, or credit cards. The fraudsters usually find their victims on online dating sites or social media.

A Huge Emotional Blow

Part of the reason why victims do not file complaints is that they are busy trying to deal with the emotional impact of finding that that someone they have feelings for was a complete fraud. The emotional loss is far more significant than the financial loss in most cases. Some feel ashamed that they’ve fallen for such a scheme and some may simply not know who they can talk to without being judged. They also know that since most of the scammers are based overseas, reporting their loses will not mean that they will be able to get it back.

Quebec and Ontario Beware

More than 66% of romance scam victims are from Quebec and Ontario, with one victim reportedly shelling out more than $72,000. To this day, there are no public data about romance scams or online dating scams so finding out where most of the money gets sent and where the fraudsters are based is not going to be easy.

Prevention is the Key

The only way to fight online dating fraud and romance scams is through prevention via proper education. Warning signs to watch out for include:

  • The scammer claiming to be from somewhere nearby but working overseas
  • The scammer claiming to be in need of financial help despite having a lucrative business or job
  • The scammer wanting to develop a long-distance relationship despite not meeting or only communicating online for a few days or weeks
  • The scammer wanting intimate photos or very personal details (which can be used for extorting money later or for identity theft)

Authorities say that there is no harm in using dating sites and talking to strangers online as long as someone is aware of the risks and watches out for red flags. Some romance scammers use the promise of love to turn another person into a money mule for money laundering.  Fraud experts say to simply stay away from things that seem too good to be true or quick professions of love from someone online. If you suspect that someone might be scamming you, contact us and let our private investigation services uncover the truth. More than love, you deserve peace of mind. Leave the internet dating investigations to us.

 

Holiday Scams to Watch Out for in 2019 and into 2020

The full swing of the holidays is just a few days away, but the scam artists are just getting started. It is time to be extra vigilant to avoid getting scammed especially when holiday shopping. Below are some of the most common holiday scams to watch out for in 2019.

Loan Scams

Holidays usually means spending a lot of money. Loan scams prey on people who need extra cash during the holidays. These fraudsters offer loans to people who need cash and then they used the personal information provided to demand payments. This is why authorities are urging people to only seek loans from established providers.

Online Shopping Scams

Online deals are usually offered by brands and stores around this time of the year but scammers have found a way to take advantage of the holiday online shopping rush as well. They usually offer once-in-a-lifetime deals that later turn out to be for counterfeits or for an item that does not exist. No matter what the rush is, it is still better to buy from trusted stores that use credit card protection and payment protection. More so, stay away from deals that sound too good to be true.

Sim Swapping

Incidences of identity theft are becoming more sophisticated with fraudsters now sending phishing emails that look like they are from valid network providers which tell the victim that they’ve won some holiday contest. The victim will then be asked to provide personal details to claim the nonexistent prize which the fraudsters will use to take over the victim’s mobile account. Once the mobile account has been taken over, it is only a matter of time to gain access to emails, social media accounts, as well as bank accounts via the hacked mobile number. Sometimes the initial message can come as a text or email from the service provider so it is best to call the service provider using another phone to verify if the message or email is real.

More Phone Scams

Phone scams are forever evolving and becoming more sinister. The CRA Scam is one example, with the fraudsters claiming to be from Canada Revenue Agency and threatening the victim with an arrest for supposedly delayed payments or back taxes. A new scam claims that the call is from Service Canada and asks the victims for the victim’s social security number or SIN. Once compromised, this is a scam that is very challenging to recover from. The fraudster gains access to very personal information such as the person’s name, date of birth, and more. Later they will demand cash and ask the victim to deposit in a safe account. It should be noted that Service Canada won’t call people to ask for personal details same as Canada Revenue Agency.

Do you need help uncovering a scam or want to protect your personal data online? We can help with both! Our private investigation services are constantly evolving and now include fraud prevention and protection. Contact us at Haywood Hunt to find out what we can do for you!

 

 

Be Aware of These Ongoing Scams in Brampton and Mississauga

Scams do not pick a season. Most scams are ongoing no matter what time of the year and even when similar scams are already being investigated after discovery by law enforcement. This is especially true in Brampton and Mississauga and so Peel police are warning residents that there are several common and ongoing scams making the rounds in the region.

Scams to Watch Out For

4 common scams have been identified by Peel Regional Police’s Service Fraud Bureau. The scams are the ones commonly targeting residents of Mississauga and Brampton. They are:

  • Canada Revenue Agency Scam or CRA Scam, otherwise known as Emergency Scam or Police or Bank Employee Scam
  • Company Invoice Scam or Paycheque Redirect
  • Employment Scams
  • Rental Accommodation Fraud

The police said that the scams lined up above are the most prevalent according to their records and the ones that pose the most threat to residents because they persist.

Different Modes, Same Scams

Some scams, like the CRA scam or bank employee and police scam, simply have the same pattern but can take so many different forms, making people fall for them again and again because each scenario can seem so convincing. It can take the form of a bank employee pretending to want to fix an internal fraud, tricking the victim into disclosing personal details and then the scammer using those details to commit more fraud. It can also take the form of a call from someone pretending to be the police or the CRA giving a warning of arrest for an alleged missing payment. Some variations involve a caller pretending to be a relative of the victim or a lawyer saying that there has been a serious car accident and bail money is needed as soon as possible. The same scenarios play out, in which the victim is targeted and made to panic to be more malleable for manipulation. Victims are then told by the scammer to buy huge amounts of gift cards and forward the gift card information to scammers over the phone, or to make a cash deposit into a Bitcoin ATM.

As for Rental Accommodation Fraud, fake landlords target prospective renters on buy-and-sell websites and are asked for a deposit to make sure that the property to be rented is reserved for them. After sending the deposit payment, the rental property turns out to be unavailable or doesn’t exist at all.

Paycheque Redirect and Company Invoice Scams target businesses by sending fake invoices that look like they were from a legitimate employee or customer. The email address used is fraudulent and usually only discovered after payments were already maid via direct transfer to a new bank account under the scammers’ control.

Employment Scams target victims that are looking for work using online services. Scammers pose as a new employer and send the victim a cheque that the victim is instructed to en-cash and deposit to another account either using Interac e-transfer or a Bitcoin ATM. The cheque turns out fraudulent later and the victim has to cover the money sent.

Be Vigilant and Beware

Residents are reminded by Peel Police to never send e-transfers unless they are sure that they are dealing with a reputable service with a guarantee for loss-prevention. Depositing cheques from an unknown source and then transferring the money to another account is also a form of money laundering which has severe consequences. It is best to be vigilant and not very trusting of people online or calls from unverifiable sources.

If you think that you or someone you know maybe being targeted for a scam, be sure to contact the local authorities in your area for a report. If you’re concerned about finding out more and whether your information may have been compromised, contact us to avail of our private investigation services for fraud prevention.