The Growing Need for Internet Dating Investigations

Scammers are everywhere online and offline. One of their favourite ways to scam people these days is via social media, email, and dating apps and websites to take advantage of those who are looking for love online. By going for an internet dating investigation, you can be sure that the person you are talking to is who he or she claims to be plus help avoid theft and fraud.

Watch Out for Internet Scams

Online dating scammers often create fake profiles using fake photos, information, and name all chosen to attract the type of victim they want. Once they have contact with a target, they will gain the trust of their targets using heartfelt conversations, loving words, and gifts to manipulate the target and to divert attention from their real identity.

Why Conduct Online Dating Investigation?

An online dating investigation is done to reveal a person’s real identity and motives. A private investigator will conduct extensive background checks, gather information across various platforms, trace messages from the original sources, and maybe find out other personal details. The information will be shared with the victim for his or her peace of mind. The information will also uncover potential criminal activities and prevent fraudulent activities from happening by providing the data to the right authorities.

What Are Common Internet Dating Scams and Other Fraudulent Activities?

There are many types of internet dating scams, but the most common ones are the following:

  • Catfishing is when a scammer uses someone else’s photos and identity to have a relationship with someone.
  • Internet scandal is when a scammer is actually a con artist who will try to grow close with a victim and ask for intimate photos and initiate intimate conversations. Once they have enough material, they will publish the information online and only unpublish in exchange for a large fee. There is no 100% way that anything published will be fully removed because other people have access to it.
  • Money laundering is when a scammer will ask the victim to transfer money or send goods for them like stolen laptops and cellphones. Some scammers ask the victims to forward cash checks and packages for them.
  • Swindling is the most common online dating scam. A scammer will gain a victim’s affection and trust and then request for help or money for what seems like valid reasons such as a medical emergency or an accident. Once they got some money or when the victim has nothing left to give, they cut contact.

How to Avoid Internet Dating Scams

Attention to detail is very important to avoid internet dating scams. Some signs may not be so obvious but are there if you know where to look. You can ask to meet in person to prevent catfishes. You can note profile inconsistencies like age and photos. It is better to keep a slow pace because scammers will try to fabricate intimacy as soon as possible by asking for personal details and declaring love early on. Try to use the dating app or site to communicate or use an email that isn’t what you normally use. Look for grammar inconsistencies as well as sentences that do not make sense can mean that the scammer may simply be copy-pasting messages. Lastly, do not send money, objects, or your personal information to someone you haven’t met in person.

Are you or someone you know dating someone online who might be a scammer? We can help at Haywood Hunt! Our private investigators offer a myriad of private investigation services that can flush out and identify a scammer so that you can have peace of mind. Contact us today!

Income Exaggeration When Applying for Mortgage is Fraud

Canadians are finding that it has become increasingly difficult to qualify for a mortgage lately, especially after several mortgage stress tests were implemented. In relation to this, a recent Equifax Canada survey revealed that a lot of Canadians are willing to commit fraud if it meant qualifying for a mortgage.

What is Mortgage Fraud?

Mortgage fraud is when a person, a real estate agent, a lawyer, or a mortgage broker or agent, exaggerates, misrepresents, or lies about information to obtain a mortgage that wouldn’t have been approved if the applicant’s true information was shared.

The recent Equifax Canada survey revealed that millennials are at double the risk of lying about their annual income as compared to the general population, as shared by Equifax Canada director of consumer advocacy Julie Kuzmic. She voiced out that it is concerning to note that young adults see no issues with inflating their income in order to buy the home they want. Note that any attempt to misrepresent data when applying for a mortgage is fraud. When people take mortgages that may be too high for their real income, they could end up having trouble paying and have more debt.

It Won’t Hurt to Be More Careful

Failing to pay mortgage payments in full and on time can have a marked negative income on credit scores and credit history. A small lie during the mortgage application process can have severe legal consequences later when the lying party realizes the repercussions of having a mortgage that one cannot afford. Equifax Canada wanted to share this information to the public to stop them from making mistakes that can have a severe negative impact on their credit history.

The recent survey further revealed that the majority of respondents do think that mortgage fraud is a growing problem. It also brought to light the fact that most consumers are not checking their credit scores prior to deciding to apply for a mortgage. 60% of the respondents admitted to not checking their credit scores before contacting a lender for a mortgage. This number is high, but a bit lower than the 68% who said the same in a similar survey in 2014.

Kuzmic says that mortgage lenders tend to examine credit scores closely, along with information such as income to have a better assessment of an individual’s ability to pay back a loan. Having a spotty credit history certainly won’t help and will probably mean getting a higher interest rate.

Stressed About Stress Tests

About half, or 48% of the respondents shared that they think the government should relax the mortgage stress test for first-time buyers. 38% shared that they think the government should simply eliminate the stress test.

Are you a lender who is having trouble verifying mortgage applicants’ information such as their income, their work, and other important data? Contact us and we’ll be happy to discuss how our private investigation services can help you in your business. We crack down on mortgage fraud and we do it stress-free!

Equifax Finds that 23% of Millennials Are Committing Mortgage Fraud

As much as 23% of millennials are lying on their mortgage application and think it is justified, according to what was found out by Equifax. They truly think that there is nothing wrong with inflating their income on their mortgage applications.

Eye Opening Survey

Equifax’s latest survey reveals that approximately 23% of millennials who are applying for mortgage thinks it is acceptable to inflate their annual income so that they can qualify for the mortgage they are applying for. Note that Equifax’s survey is about mortgage fraud.

Equifax surveyed 1,545 Canadians from across the country. 23% of millennials think inflating one’s income is totally fine. Almost double from the 12% who think the same from the entire population.

In a press release, Equifax Canada director of consumer advocacy Julie Kuzmic says that inflating income or manipulating it in any way for a mortgage application is fraud. It can also become a problem because people may take mortgages they can’t truly afford and end up spreading themselves too thin and garnering debt that could spell trouble in the future.

A huge mortgage means bigger monthly payments. Failure to make monthly mortgage payments can have a negative impact on one’s credit score and credit history. Equifax Canada is one of the country’s main credit bureaus and provides Canadians with free credit reports.

Legal Ramifications

19% of the millennials surveyed admitted that they are downright not truthful in their mortgage applications while some of the 18 to 34 year-old crowd said they thought exaggerating their information is acceptable. Kuzmic says people can end up facing a lot of legal consequences later if they fail on their mortgage payments.

More Survey Reveals

What is interesting is that 16% of those surveyed believe that mortgage fraud is a victimless crime. 23% of millennials surveyed share the same sentiments. More so, the survey found out that Canadians have not been checking their credit scores too. More than half of those surveyed revealed that they do not check what credit score they have before applying for a mortgage. The numbers are a bit better compared to 68% of Canadians who did not do the same in an old Equifax survey from 2014.

According to Kuzmic, mortgage lenders require a minimum score of between 600 to 680 to get mortgage approval. She added that mortgage lenders often scrutinize various factors along with the credit scores. It is an industry-standard for lenders to check other factors such as a borrower’s income and ability to pay back a loan. She added that having a spotty credit history isn’t ideal if applying for a loan to receive funding for a huge purchase.

The survey’s findings are concerning because of what it means for the mortgage industry overall. Traditional lenders already have a difficult time verifying borrower’s income because of how they are regulated; this adds another layer of challenges for both lenders and borrowers. Some respondents also stated that this behaviour could be because of the mortgage stress test for first time home buyers. The test renders a lot of young Canadians with little to no chance of buying a home.

One thing is for sure and that is mortgage fraud of any kind is just not going to help any party in the long run. If you’re a mortgage lender and need help verifying the information submitted by borrowers or want to conduct background checks on borrowers, we’d be happy to help at Haywood Hunt & Associates. Contact us today for a consultation on how our private investigation services can benefit your business.

The Fight Against Mortgage Fraud in Canada

Canadians, in general, are usually easily content and have a tendency to just go with the status quo. The good thing is that this way has served us good during various economic issues such as the financial crisis of 2008. Unfortunately, mortgage fraud has risen up so drastically in the past few years, reaching 52%, that complacency with the current situation just isn’t enough.

The Dirt on Mortgage Fraud

It is no secret that the mortgage application and approval process in Canada has become a lot trickier in recent years with the introduction of policy changes and various regulations meant to give better protection to prospective homebuyers.

With the above changes, things have increasingly become complicated for borrowers and brokers when it comes to getting a loan but interestingly, the susceptibility to mortgage fraud has undergone nearly no change.

The unpleasant truth is that the way a mortgage is designed in Canada makes it easy for fraudsters to cheat the system. For instance, the borrower process is too heavily reliant on information and documents provided by the borrower, making it an easy point of entry for the fraudster. Why are things this way instead of lenders getting the information straight from respective sources is a big question. An easy fix will be to change the process and require information to come only for specific sources.

Available Technology Needs Harnessing

Canada is lagging behind the United States and the United Kingdom about having information come from specific sources only but the technology to make things harder for fraudsters does exist in Canada. Finicity, Flinks, and others are third-party applications that make it possible to get important information on funds, payments, and income directly from a consumer’s bank account data. This technology is not yet available to the mortgage industry but it shouldn’t be difficult to make it happen.

The CMHC initiated a similar preventive measure for Canada Revenue Agency so now they have a direct role in verifying income. This data will provide direct access to the borrower’s Notice of Assessment if the borrower consents.

There is little to no progress to this actually happening despite Canadians supporting the move for an improved process. The CRA definitely needs to have a formal program to access data and the CMHC needs to help guide this process.

Combating Mortgage Fraud

It is for the interest of everyone, lenders, borrowers, and mortgage professionals to champion against mortgage fraud. Industry regulators just don’t have enough resources to fight against it on their own. What is best is if an amendment could be made to the overall lending process. This amendment will make it easier for lenders to keep lending with less interference and risks.

Are you a lender who is worried about a possible fraudulent data from a borrower? Let us at Haywood Hunt, verify information for you! Our private investigation services can dig for information as well as alert you for inconsistencies that may spell disaster for you. Contact us today for details.

 

Toronto Immigration Firm Charges $170K for Fake Jobs in Canada

Toronto is one of the best places to live not only in Canada but in the world. A lot of people want to move to Toronto and a huge number are from overseas. Unfortunately, some crooks are taking advantage of this and charging would-be Chinese immigrants exorbitant amounts for immigration opportunities.

Immigration Scam?

A Toronto immigration firm was found out to be charging as much as $170,000 to cover a would-be immigrant’s paper trail, wages, and employer’s fee as unveiled by an undercover CBC journalist. The journalist posed as a Chinese National who wants to seek permanent residence in Canada. Those who want to be an immigrant with the help of WonHoTa Consulting Inc. have to pay the $170,000 fee directly to the personal account of WonHonTa’s sole director (done to get out of paying taxes). More details about how everything worked with WonHonta was shared via WeChat by Jiacheng Song, manager of Nanjing Youtai Investment Consulting Co. Ltd, an affiliate of the immigration firm. Song wrote that they have employers who work with them in exchange for money. The employer gets paid for sponsoring clients for immigration and in turn, makes easy money while getting free labour for half a year.

Fake Jobs for Permanent Residency

Simply put, WonHonTa Consulting offers fake jobs to aspiring immigrants as shared by Vancouver immigration lawyer and policy analyst Richard Kurland. This practice is illegal and hurts the integrity of the Canadian immigration program plus also affects legitimate immigrants who follow the rules.

The truth is, real jobs are not easy to find and very few are really good opportunities. Nanjing Youtai finds Chinese nationals who want to immigrate to Canada and refers them to Toronto-based WonHonTa. For the undercover journalist, Song recommended that he consider Atlantic Canada or Saskatchewan because it is a lot easier to get to them with lower requirements and shorter waiting times. Song further shared that in the past year, he was able to get about 10 Chinese nationals to Saskatchewan and about 12 to Atlantic Canada.

WonHonTa promotes employment to a range of skilled jobs via WeChat. They mention daycare workers, sewing machine operators, welders, and more. They also claim to have a national network of headhunters who recruit willing employers and states that some of them are even government immigration officials. They claim to help a lot of people find success and so that justifies their increasing fees. They also say that without a certain fee, employers won’t want to be a part of their operations. Note that foreign workers need to prove that they are employed in a skilled profession in Canada so that they can qualify for permanent residency.

Tracking the Fraud

The people behind WonHonTai and Nanjing Youtai repeatedly told the undercover journalist that it is unlikely that their scheme will ever be uncovered. They also said that if the immigrant will choose to work in the Canadian company that sponsored them for real, they will get back some of what they paid in the form of wages. The concerning detail is that they claimed that they will also provide the necessary documentation should the immigrant choose not to work, just to make things look good on paper and make it seem like the immigrant is employed. There are more details but it took someone going undercover to flush out the truth.

Perpetrators of fraud are getting smarter. It is best to be on the lookout and be wary of offers that seem to good too be true or too easy. If in doubt about a possible fraudulent work opportunity in Toronto, it is best to stay informed and maybe consult private investigators in Toronto for help. Contact Haywood Hunt & Associates today!

 

 

 

The 3 Most Common Types of Identity Theft

Identity fraud and identity theft are common occurrences these days. They happen when someone obtains and uses someone else’s personal data in a fraudulent or deceitful manner for economic gain or other reasons. The problem is becoming even more prevalent because of misinformation online and the lack of response from appropriate agencies to fix it.

The categories of identity theft include:

  • Account takeover fraud
  • Business or commercial identity theft
  • Criminal identity theft
  • Identity cloning
  • Medical identity theft
  • New account fraud

For this write-up, we will focus on just the 3 most common types of identity theft because each type above has numerous subtypes and may need an entire book to cover everything. It is important to spread awareness about the common types of identity theft because not only can they result in financial loss, some examples can really destroy lives for the long-term.

Account Takeover Fraud

The most common account takeover fraud is financial identity theft wherein the criminal uses another person’s account information such as bank account details to obtain services and products. It can also mean withdrawing money from a person’s bank account. Oftentimes, perpetrators get the data from online sources such as by phishing or can be offline sources such as lifted from purses or wallets, the mail, the phone, or even by going through the trash. Most of the time, the victim is the first person to notice discrepancies such as additional charges on a credit card, unauthorized withdrawals on a bank account, or having a few bounced checks. Oftentimes, perpetrators pose as the victim to pull off this type of identity theft.

Business or Commercial Identity Theft

Using another person’s name or business details to get products and services fall under business identity theft or commercial identity theft. The usual way this is done is by using a company’s or an individual’s social security number. Some numbers that are readily available in dumpsters, public records, and the like may also be used to commit this type of identity theft. In a lot of cases, business identity theft is an inside job or committed by ex-employees or current staff. Most victims of business identity only became aware of the crime after significant losses or until when someone notices discrepancies in the records. The reason why businesses can often lose large amounts of money to this type of identity theft is because this can go on for years without anyone noticing.

New Account Fraud                      

New account fraud is when someone else uses another person’s details and good credit standing to create a new fake account to obtain products and services. This can be done by creating a new cell phone, new credit card, or new utility bill account using the stolen details of another person. The thief will use another mailing address so the real person behind the stolen identity will not know about the fraud until much later when there’s already been a lot of debt under their name or SSN or when they get turned down from credit application because of bad debts that they know nothing about.

Were you a victim of identity fraud? Do you know that private investigators can help you uncover the people behind it as well as check for possible breaches in your privacy to prevent it from occurring again? Contact us at Haywood Hunt to know more about identity fraud prevention and what actions you can take against it!

Sentence for $41M Revenue Canada Fraud Increased to 3 Years

Kevin Plange, a Toronto man who has been found to have almost defrauded $40 million from Revenue Canada was given an increase of prison sentence. Ontario Court of Appeal said that the 18 months ruling which was initially given to Plange was too short a time for the crime he committed and so the sentence was upped to 3 years.

Appeal Court Steps In

According to the Appeal Court, the sentence initially imposed was not fit when compared to other large-scale frauds and that the sentencing judge understated the respondent’s moral blameworthiness. With this said, the court also decided that the initial time served is enough and Plange does not have to go back to jail. The court also said that his rehabilitation showed that there is no need for serving more time in jail.

On a separate note, the Appeal Court upheld the validity of serving a mandatory sentence of 2 years of jail time for fraud over $1 million. They also added that the trial judge engaged in unacceptable hypothetical exercise by determining that provision as unconstitutional.

Case Details

Plange is a University of Toronto arts graduate who has been earning well. He developed a gambling problem which resulted in huge debts. By his admission, he engaged in a year-long scam starting August 2013 in which he made 28 fake direct-deposit information forms to CRA.

Because of the above, CRA deposited millions of dollars in tax refunds and rebates owed to 12 huge corporations into bank accounts controlled by Plange. When things were discovered, CRA has already paid Plange almost $42 million. It was only due to bank diligence that Plange was only able to withdraw $15,000. Considering everything, the defrauded amount is still more than $1,000,000.

Superior Court Justice Shaun Nakatsuru considered the mandatory minimum of 2 years imprisonment as cruel and unusual although he acknowledged that it was not out of line for what Plange did. Instead of the mandatory sentence for fraud over $1,000,000, he sentenced Plange to 18 months and reduced to 13 months for pre-sentence bail conditions and time served. The Crown appealed for both and the Appeal Court agreed on both appeals. The Appeal Court stated that Nakatsuru engaged in wrong speculation and used hypothetical situations where the mandatory minimum could be seen as excessive. They also said that any future attempt to overturn the mandatory minimum will undergo an evaluation based on the facts presented and the time.

Unjust Sentencing?

Regarding the sentence given to Plange. The Appeal Court found out that the judge believed Plange’s excuses that the fraud committed was spontaneous, simple, and was a one-time act. The Appeal Court also said that this claim is incomplete and made to understate the effort made by Plange to commit fraud.

Fraud is everywhere and people will do anything to excuse the fraud they’ve committed. If you want to know the truth, you will have to dig deep with the help of professionals. If you need private investigation services such as consulting, surveillance, background checks, or more, contact us to talk to our private investigators.

The Big Cost of Small Business Fraud

Small business fraud happens across all countries and social status. Although the figures we shared in this write up is a couple of years old, the trend remains the same and it is clear that small business fraud is costing companies a huge amount of money each year.

Losing Money to Fraud

The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners releases the Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse every couple of years. It showed that in 2016, business fraud for 114 countries clocked in a median loss of $150,000 per company and that it took approximately 18 months before fraud was detected. Another shocking fact is that 76% of fraud was by people from each company’s customer service, purchasing, operations, sales, management, and accounting departments.

Effect of Fraud for Small Businesses

Given the median figure lost to fraud, it isn’t difficult to imagine how much fraud affects small businesses. Generally speaking, small businesses do not have enough buffer to cover a median loss of $150,000, unlike bigger businesses. A business worth $500,000 will no doubt be crippled by a loss of $150,000 versus a business worth a couple of millions which will have an easier time bouncing back. Note too that despite fraud getting uncovered, 58.1% of all victim companies do not ever recover any of their fraud-related losses.

Now, consider too that more than 23% of victimized companies lose more than $1,000,000. A loss this huge will force a small business to close doors or downsize to the point of only operating with a skeleton crew.

It is Time to Act Against Fraud

With the scary figures shared above, there is no better time to act against small business fraud than now. There is no need to wait until you uncover fraud in your organization when you can work against preventing it now. If you are a small business owner, you may want to take a closer look into how you run your company because it is small businesses that often do not have the correct measures to prevent occupational fraud from happening, to begin with.

Try to look from the top going to the bottom. Why? Because chances are that you’ll lose more to a manager committing fraud than an employee sneaking out a few office supplies home. Optimizing your internal control is one of the best ways you can prevent fraud in your business.

You can also implement counter checks to prevent fraud. You can start with making sure that there are multiple people with separate duties who are responsible for handling accounts payable and accounts receivable. This will minimize the possibility of an individual manipulating records to pocket some of the company’s funds. If this is not feasible for you, you can make use of digital tools that you can access anywhere you may be or perhaps outsource your bookkeeping so that a third party can easily detect any suspicious activity.

There are a lot more solutions to prevent small business fraud other than the ones outlined above. If you’re keen to know more, contact us at Haywood Hunt and find out how some of our private investigation services can be used to combat fraud in your organization.

 

Investment Company 1PLUS12 Allegedly Involved in Fraud – Sued for almost $2M by Investor

1PLUS12 is an investment company that used to be trusted by their clients until news broke out that they are possibly linked to a $17M Toronto mortgage fraud. One of their consultants was also involved in a B.C. based financial company that lost almost $19M of its investors’ and creditors’ money.

Ruined Reputation?

1PLUS12 calls itself an ‘international investment training company’. They also claim that they can make their clients rich through their unique and uncommon approach to investing.

An investigation by Global News unearthed two lawsuits with a total of $6.4M against 1PLUS12. Further digging revealed that 1PLUS12 is linked to a $17M high-end real estate mortgage fraud in Toronto. It also came to light that one of 1PLUS12’s consultants is the same person behind Dexior Financial, a B.C. company that is facing financial issues after losing $19M of its investors’ and creditors’ money.

Unworthy of Trust?

A former client, named Roman Turlo, is now suing 1PLUS12 for almost $2. Turlo stated that the company is making money off of trusting, innocent people, adding that the company allegedly misrepresented real estate opportunities in a fraudulent manner. Turlo further shared that 1PLUS12 claims to use a mix of international and local real estate plus optimized tax and legal strategies to help people become financially independent and free.

1PLUS12 Introduction – Who Are They?

1PLUS12 still operates unregulated by the OSC, the Ontario Securities Commission or the FSCO, the Financial Services Commission of Ontario – the agency that watches over the mortgage industry. To date, 1PLUS12 still have upcoming workshops scheduled for April 2019 and May 2019. Experts express concern that this is a reflection of problems Canada’s real estate and investment sectors.

Glenn Estrabillo, the CEO of 1PLUS 12, declined several requests for an interview by Global News. Estrabillo stated that the company is fighting defamatory and false allegations in court and that they will continue to stand by their investment strategy. To date, none of the allegations against the company have been in court.

Investment Gone Wrong

Turlo shared that he began investing with 1PLUS12 in 2013. He began taking seminars and claims that he spent more than $700,000 as part of an 11-person investing group under 1PLUS12’s guidance.

According to Turlo’s lawsuit, the company promised exclusive mentorship and unique real estate investments that can produce more than 20% in returns. As a group, they spent more than $5.6M on a dozen properties, 1 in Belize and 11 in Ontario. The investment was pitched to them as low risk with good returns. Things were as expected for the first few years until Turlo found out that one of the properties they invested in was sold without their knowledge. This made him suspicious. Later discoveries are even more alarming as he found out that there was no record that their group ever invested in any of the properties.

Updates

This case is currently ongoing in court and 1PLUS12 declines to give further statements, saying that they are aware of the comments against them by a small number of investors and that they are facing the said investors in court.

Are you planning to invest in real estate but not sure about the company you want to work with? Do you need professional help finding out detailed information in a legal manner? Contact us and we’ll discuss how our private investigation services can help safeguard your investments and your future against fraud. Talk to us as soon as possible!

Dishonest Pharmacists in Ontario Are Stealing Millions Meant for the Poor

Fraudulent pharmacists in Ontario have been pocketing millions of dollars meant for the poor over the past few years. Recent reports show that Ontario’s Drug Benefit program have been overbilled by dishonest pharmacists for hundreds of thousands of dollars up to a few million dollars at a time.

How Do They Do It?

A man who identified himself as ‘The Cleaner’ shared that he helps with the scam by fixing the papers and cleaning up the books of any pharmacy that availed of his services. He’s the person who makes the fraudulent pharmacy look as clean as any other pharmacy.

‘The Cleaner’ further shared that pharmacies flagged for overbilling by the Ontario Drug Benefit Program (ODB) usually call him to help them create a paper trail to hide their fraud and get them off the hook. The pharmacists are aware that they are committing fraud and that they could go to jail but that seems to push them, even more, to hire ‘The Cleaner’ to clean up their act and committing more crime in the process.

‘The Cleaner’ divulged that his long career in the health care field allowed him to have more insight about the system and said that he found ways to game it. He creates fake transfers from other pharmacies to fix discrepancies in inventory when Ministry of Health auditors look for medications that were billed by the pharmacy despite never having them in stock. To date, ‘The Cleaner’ helped disguise fraud in more than 100 pharmacies on Ontario in the last 5 years without breaking a sweat.

Pharmacists fool auditors with ‘The Cleaner’s’ coaching. He tells the pharmacists to tell the auditors that they simply forgot to enter certain data and to act like they knew about the medications but simply didn’t enter their data into the system. There are also instances when auditors inform the pharmacy that they are going to conduct an inspection ahead of time so ‘The Cleaner’ simply comes over and fixes what needs fixing in as little as just 3 hours.

The Big Impact

Ontario’s most vulnerable benefit from the medications provided by the ODB. The ODB provides medications for those on social assistance, the elderly, and children by shouldering most if not all of the medication cost for qualified patients. This program costs Ontario about $5.4 billion a year.

The province is billed by pharmacists every 2 weeks for the medications they dispensed to ODB patients and they are then paid afterward. Fraudulent pharmacists commit fraud by overbilling, listing drugs they never dispensed, and adding those to the bill they send ODB. Because of this, funds that are meant to go to the sick and needy are funneled into dishonest pharmacists’ pockets.

To date, very few pharmacists are getting caught and those that were caught usually manage to avoid jail. This is a problem that is costing Ontario a lot of money as there are instances when a caught pharmacist has several pharmacies all overbilling the province but can’t be charged due to lack of evidence.

Fraud happens in any industry. Pharmacy fraud has many aspects and uncovering one still leaves a significant number behind. All that can be done is to be more vigilant for fraud detection and to have safety measures in place for fraud prevention. Our private investigation services can help with these! Contact us today!