Lawyer in Ontario Allegedly Stole Millions from His Clients

ottawa-fraud

Your lawyer is probably the last person you can expect to do something shady but sometimes people are simply not who they present themselves to be. Earlier this month in Rockland, Ontario, a lawyer had his license suspended after it was discovered that around $4 million in funds held trust for the lawyer’s clients was missing.

Tale of the Missing $4 Million

The lawyer, Joseph Stephane Langlois, have close to 20 years work experience. His colleague, a senior partner at Charron Langlois LLP shared that he is in shock after finding out about the discrepancies in the bank accounts for Langlois’ clients.

Pierre Charron, Langlois’s partner at the firm says that he finds it personally deeply distasteful to deal with Langlois but he has no choice. He shared that he’s at a loss for words and that he is still in a state of utter and unbelievable shock over the issue.

A notice of motion was filed with the Law Society Tribunal wherein allegations state that only $220,000 was left of the about $4 million in funds that Langlois was holding for his clients in trust. A recent review of accounts was the instrument for the discovery of the discrepancy.

In the motion, it was also claimed that Langlois made an admission to a Law Society investigator about where the money went. He said that he spent close to $1 million of the money in trust for his law firm and personal use.

Langlois and his lawyer attended a hearing in Toronto earlier this month. In the hearing, a panel ordered Langlois not to practice law as his license is temporarily suspended for the duration of the investigation. It is to be noted that Langlois practiced family and commercial law.

Dealing with the Backlash

In the meantime, Pierre Charron created a new law firm with a new name in an effort to distance himself from his former partner. His firm’s name is Charron Pilon Sauve and all 3 partners in the new firm were able to retain 95% of their clients after the discovery of the issue with the missing funds, shared Charron.

As for now, the Law Society is continuing its investigation. Charron shared that he cannot comment on who and how many clients are affected by the missing funds.

Pierre Charron has been in practicing law for 31 years. He shared that from his first day as a lawyer, it is understood that a lawyer simply should treat dealing with another person’s money as a sacred duty. Messing with it is certainly out of the question.

DRS Construction’s owner Gerry Dube said Langlois has been his lawyer for the ongoing Ottawa Hospital fraud lawsuit the past year and got more than $100,000 in legal fees from him. He retained new lawyers since this situation has surfaced and said that it certainly surprised everyone in Rockland.

Langlois is represented by Matthew Gourlay from the Henein Hutchinson LLP firm in Toronto. He declined to leave comments about the case and said that the investigation is still on-going, saying that they need time to understand the issue.

Looking for private investigators in Toronto to help you with cases like this? Contact us at Haywood Hunt for private investigation services and more!

Why Even Rich People Commit Fraud

white-collar-fraud

Have you ever wondered why someone who is already swimming in money still feels the need to defraud someone else? What truly motivates someone to commit white collar fraud?

Isn’t it ironic that the type of financial fraud that incurs the largest losses are typically unnoticed (or are often just discovered by chance) despite efforts in governance and detection?

Understanding the criminal mind has long fascinated psychologists and psychiatrists from around the world. We already know that researchers say that the fraud triangle – 3 factors that are needed to commit fraud has to be present for fraud to occur, but surely there is more to it?

Harvard professor Eugene Soltes has an answer. He says that even rich people commit fraud because they think they can get away with it. It is as simple as that, white-collar criminals will commit fraud for the sheer thrill of it, or so it seems.

Inside the Rich Criminal’s Mind

In his book, Why They Did It: Inside the Mind of the White-Collar Criminal, Soltes explained why people who already have status and wealth still commit financial crimes such as in the case of business executives.

To write the book, the Harvard professor wrote to 4 dozen convicted fraudsters. The people he sought answers from range from Andrew Fastow of Enron Corp, Ponzi scheme manipulator Bernard Madoff, to Dennis Kozlowski of the US$600 million Tyco International fraud.

The criminals responded with all sorts of reasons but the most common 3 are:

I Simply Did It Because I Can

It is all about the ego for some white-collar fraudsters. They are typically respected members of the community, with high social standings and have an educated background but that is not enough for them. They want to feel more ahead of their game, like they are somehow better than others. Typically, they enjoy bending other people to their will and have no problem using their specialized skills and knowledge to get what they want.

Dennis Kozlowski told Soltes that he believed he can do anything, primarily because Tyco’s board will gladly do whatever he says and believe anything he tells them.

It Is Not Really That Bad

Some well-intentioned fraudsters believe that they can somehow repay the money before their deceit would be discovered. Because they don’t really mean to take the money, they rationalize their behavior because they believe that it is for a good purpose.

This is true for Bernie Madoff, who believed that him taking some money can easily be reversed. His reason was that he will repay the money once his other plan worked and no one will know any loss ever occurred.

I Have to Do It

Some fraudsters really do think that they are acting in a legitimate manner. Some of them even believe that their ‘brave’ actions are what is needed for their organization’s survival. They somehow view themselves as martyrs or heroes willing to do the dirty work to save everyone else.

Former Enron chief financial officer Andrew Fastow told Soltes that if he didn’t do what he did, someone else will; that’s why he felt the need to go ahead and do what he thinks needs to be done.

Suspecting white-collar fraud in your organization? Give your Toronto private investigators a call for assistance with uncovering possible fraudulent activity or white-collar crime. Contact us today!

SEC Whistleblower Gets $22 Million Award

SEC

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has awarded $22 million to a whistleblower whose detailed tip and extensive assistance helped the agency halt a well-hidden fraud at the company where the whistleblower worked.

The $22 million-plus award is the second-largest total the SEC has awarded a whistleblower.

The largest, $30 million, was awarded in 2014.

“Company employees are in unique positions behind-the-scenes to unravel complex or deeply buried wrongdoing,” said Jane Norberg, Acting Chief of the SEC’s Office of the Whistleblower. “Without this whistleblower’s courage, information, and assistance, it would have been extremely difficult for law enforcement to discover this securities fraud on its own,”

The SEC’s whistleblower program, which has been rewarding valuable information from tipsters since its inception in 2011, has now surpassed $100 million in total money awarded.

More than $107 million has been awarded to 33 whistleblowers who became eligible for an award by voluntarily providing the SEC with original and useful information that led to a successful enforcement action.

Whistleblower awards can range from 10 percent to 30 percent of the money collected when the monetary sanctions exceed $1 million.

All payments are made out of an investor protection fund established by Congress that is financed through monetary sanctions paid to the SEC by securities law violators.

No money has been taken or withheld from harmed investors to pay whistleblower awards.

By law, the SEC protects the confidentiality of whistleblowers and does not disclose information that might directly or indirectly reveal a whistleblower’s identity.

Whistleblower Initiative at OSC Draws Mixed Reaction

OSC

The first ever paid whistleblower program backed by a Canadian securities regulator was launched by the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) recently.

Ontario’s New Office of the Whistleblower       

An up to $5 million offer awaits those who will turn in tips and reports of fraud to Ontario’s new Office of the Whistleblower. Anyone who has information on disclosure violations, market manipulation, and illegal insider trading can contact authorities to report such data. In instances where sanctions are imposed, whistleblowers can be awarded with up to $1.5 million.

All of the above is meant to change people’s perception of whistleblowing. Whistleblowers stand to lose their jobs and possibly get personal threats because of their role in exposing a misconduct.

Mixed Reaction About the New Program

Office of the Whistleblower in Toronto chief Kelly Gorman says that whistleblowers need to know that they will be protected should they choose to come in the open regarding some shady activities. She added that this is not only going to be an absolute game changer for law enforcers, this can also protect Ontario investors more.

Toronto law firm Fasken Martineau senior partner Norm Keith begs to differ. He says that the program may not receive the expected level of success because he does not believe that an “American-style bounty hunter” approach is going to work in Canada.

In the US, the Office of the Whistleblower in their Securities and Exchange Commission rewards tipsters with 10 to 30% of the money collected from viable leads, viable leads described as those that provided information that caused a SEC enforcement action in which sanctions of more than US$1 million has been ordered.

Keith added that in Canada, there is no tradition of holding alleged wrongdoers accountable. He also shared his sentiments about the $5 million ceiling for rewards as too small. He further said that the OSC has a poor track record for prosecuting those involved in securities fraud such as insider trading and because of this, he is thinking that the chances of a tip being used to pursue a hearing to penalize perpetrators are cute low.

As for Gorman, she says that the program will enhance OSC’s ability to achieve better outcomes for Canadian markets as far as identifying and pursuing any securities violations This can also help the OSC protect investors. She further added that previously handled cases had favourable outcomes, with voluntary payments made to the OSC once a case has been identified.

How ‘Rewarding’ Will This Be for Whistleblowers?

A whistleblower can be an awarded only when a tip is deemed eligible for the reward. To qualify as such, information provided must lead to voluntary payments or settlements of more than $1 million. Gorman added that a whistleblower is eligible of 5% to 15% of whatever exceeds $1 million. The percentage of the payout will be determined by a number of factors, including if a whistleblower is involved in the case (or not), in which case the percentage would be on the lower end.

Keith expressed that he finds it disturbing that a co-conspirator can easily be rewarded under the OSC policy. If something goes wrong in a deal, a co-criminal, co-accused, or co-conspirator can simply turn in the other party and still be monetarily rewarded. Keith expressed that this is against the Anglo-Canadian tradition and common law that no one should gain profit from committing a crime.

Gorman responded that depending on how involved a whistleblower is, he or she can also be made to answer to the law. With this said, she added that part of the enhanced protection of the new policy is allowing anonymous tips from whistleblowers.

Want to know more about how having a whistleblower program could benefit your organization? Contact us at Haywood Hunt today for your obligation-free initial consultation. We’ll help you find out more details about how private investigators can help you with your whistleblower program.

 

Is It Time to Develop a Whistleblower Program for the Mortgage Industry?

whistleblower

An up to $5 million offer will be rewarded to whistleblowers for Ontario’s securities regulator newly launched whistleblower program. The program’s aim is to lead to the prosecution of fraudsters, fraud being one of the biggest reasons for business losses of billions of dollars a year. With this in the works, is it time for the mortgage industry to launch a whistleblower program as well?

The answer to this is, of course, not as easy as the question itself although the allure of the benefits from the Ontario Securities Commission isn’t easy to ignore either. The program gives initiatives to whistleblowers and encourages people to let the commission know of any market manipulation, potential instances of fraud, and other unsavoury activities concerning the securities industry.

The Ontario Securities Commission Whistleblower Program

An incentive of up to $5 million is being offered by the commission for truly valuable information. Besides the cash incentive, the whistleblower will also be extended some protection – a first in Canada!

It should be noted that similar programs have been launched in the past but was met with little success. Nevertheless, this program by the Ontario Securities Commission is definitely a step in the right direction, so the question is…

Should This Also Be Applied to the Mortgage Sector?

As you may have already guessed, the answer to this question will not be a straight one as well. Tip lines are known to have a not-so-high success rate.

Butler Mortgage’s broker Ron Butler was quoted by MortgageBrokerNews.ca to have said the same about success rates for whistleblower programs. He cited similar programs in the past that are good intentions, but did not garner good results. He further cited the US’s SEC as an example, saying that although it is our neighbour’s longest-lived and biggest financial services tip line, the failures far outweigh the few successes. The reason for this is because some tips have been ignored by the organization if the person being reported is well-connected or has a great reputation. Bernie Madoff has been reported 5 times by the same securities analyst, but the SEC repeatedly ignored all 5 letters/reports. The reason being Bernie Madoff is a well-connected individual.

Tip lines can become problematic because separating false tips from real ones can be quite challenging. Former employees and terminated agents are known to send in fraudulent tips to wreak havoc on the life of someone they’re holding a grudge against. It is instances like this that make tip lines not very reliable more so if mismanaged.

Perhaps the to get the best use out of tip lines, it should be monitored by professionals who know their way in getting the truth out of every situation. Private investigation firms with decades of experience and a proven track record could be utilized, but that will, of course, cost money as every report or letter will have to be addressed.

With everything said, having a whistleblower program is only as good as its implementation. Seek a professional to handle yours should you decide to implement one in your organization. Contact us at Haywood Hunt for an obligation-free initial consultation to know more about how private investigators can help you with your whistleblower program.

 

Employees Caught Abusing Healthcare Insurance Plan

health-insurance

A few weeks ago, what was dubbed as Sudbury’s largest fraud trial came to a close with the guilty verdict handed out to fraudsters Dirk Plate and Paul Caron. The duo helped defraud about $24million from Atlas Copco Canada. Their sentencing hearing will be on October 25. The concluding chapter to this fraud case was brought with a whistleblower’s help.

Plate was Atlas Copco’s general manager at their Sudbury office from 2001 to 2007 and Caron managed Atlas Copco’s employee benefits as a Montreal insurance broker. Their fraud covered a period of six years.

Health Benefits Fraud

The disturbing fact is that overbilling health benefits is a common occurrence in Canada. In fact, the Canadian Health Care Anti-fraud Association reported that fraudulent billing activity is responsible for a private health care plan loss of $1.2 to $6 billion dollars a year.

The issue above presents a problem for employers. Employers are concerned about keeping health insurance costs down without resorting to cutting health benefits of employees.

Health benefit plans are being abused in various ways these days. Some employees can duplicate a billing by hiding the double billing between a stash of small medical bills. Sometimes a therapist can tell someone to come in for more unnecessary appointments to bill time. Also, some doctors may over-prescribe drugs that are on the expensive side although those medications may not really be needed.

Needless to say, employee abuse of their benefits plan is very common and can be a huge financial loss to a company. Below are some ways employers can protect themselves from health benefits fraud with the help of a plan provider.

Protect Your Business from Employee Health Benefits Fraud

Oftentimes employees commit fraud because they do not understand how this affects them and the company in the long run. If you are a plan provider, you have to inform your clients that plans are composed of the risk insurance and the transactional costs.

You may need to explain the direct relationship between the annual claims and the future viability of the plan you are providing. Your client needs to look at the whole picture.

You’ll have to carefully design the plan. Adding a layer of pre-authorization such as each procedure having to undergo pre-approval prior to completion.

A tiered plan that divides drugs into groups based on costs can mitigate costs. Here’s more detail about this.

Employees and employers both benefit from fighting health benefit plan abuse and fraud. Because abuse results to increased plan premium and costs, plus causes eliminations and reductions of plan coverage to contain costs, everyone suffers a loss if abuse is allowed to continue. Add to this the fact that committing health care plan fraud is a criminal offense that can cost perpetrators their job and land them in jail, there is really no long-term gain from engaging in such a fraud.

Concerned about possible fraud in your business? Contact us for an obligation-free initial consultation. Our Toronto private investigators are here help you get to the bottom of things. Talk to us today!

 

KPMG Report Says Insurance Sector Needs Drastic Measures to Reinvent Itself

HWH

A new report by KPMG report shared data that could be alarming for some people. The report shared that only half of the global insurers who participated in the poll believe that they can extract and sustain value from business transformation initiatives. Furthermore, 57% of the poll respondents admitted that they have had less than successful in their transformation efforts.

The report was released through Forbes Insights and featured the results of the survey wherein 70 insurance executives from all over the world participated. The poll was conducted by the audit, tax, and advisory services firm KPMG to find out about global insurers’ perceptions of the biggest risks they face, their current capabilities, and their recent transformation initiatives. Of the respondents, 19% are from Asia Pacific, 33% are from the Americas, and about half, 48% are from Europe.

Empowered for the Future?

The KPMG report, with the title, Empowered for the Future: Insurance Reinvented, insurers are struggling to adapt their organizations for the future, although they do know that they urgently need to transform existing practices to be ready for it. A statement by KPMG says that insurers are not placing enough attention on the changing needs and preferences of their clientele and are mostly focused on implications of regulatory policy. The statement also added that less than a fourth of those polled expect that their current operations can be disrupted by changes in customer behavior.

The report’s lead author and KPMG’s global lead partner for insurance innovation and change Mary Trussell notes that very little has changed although insurers have been trying to transform their organizations for tens of years. She added that more fundamental changes need to be done in the insurance business and their operations if they are to truly adapt to the future.

Uphill Battle for Sustainability

Although 53% of the insurers that achieving short-term transformation is doable, the same cannot be said for a sustainable transformational outcome.

KPMG International global head of insurance Gary Reader said that it takes a more strategic approach to truly accomplish an organization’s reinvention and that it is far more complicated than most insurers have done with their past initiatives.

Change and Technology

Another interesting data from the report is that insurers are now seriously viewing new technology as a catalyst for change. 47% are recognizing that apps and mobile platforms are creating new opportunities for transformation and are forcing their business to change. 41% said the same about data and analytics and 45% concurred that the same can be said about social collaboration and networking.

The survey noted that a third of the respondents shared that they were watching non-insurance businesses to help them find inspiration to help reinvent their organizations. Reader further notes that insurers are taking approaches and ideas from other sectors to come up with effective strategies themselves, a move that allows insurers to compete with not just other insurers, but also with other businesses for customer’s attention.

Trussel shares that many insurers may still not be seeing the need to set their sights on the ultimate prize, how to be at the top of their game and not just be able to endure the changes the future is asking for them to make.

How stable is your insurance business? What changes do you need to implement to go with the tide? Will you sail to success or sink to the abyss of adaptation failure? We may be able to help. Contact us today for a consultation!

 

Mississauga company fined $266,000 for ‘campaign of abuse’ against deaf worker

mississauga-fraud

By

A Mississauga company found to have mocked, humiliated and launched a “campaign of abuse” designed to force a deaf employee’s resignation has been ordered by Ontario’s top court to pay her $266,000.

The stinging Ontario Court of Appeal decision amplified the original damages awarded to Vicky Strudwick by more than $100,000. The result comes after four years of legal proceedings against her former employer, Applied Consumer and Clinical Evaluations (ACCE), for wrongful dismissal, breach of the human rights code and intentional infliction of mental suffering. Her lawyer called the lawsuit the “worst employment case” he’s seen in 31 years of practising.

Less than a year after she suddenly became deaf, a condition doctors believe may have been caused by a virus, the 56-year-old was fired from the polling and research firm in May 2011. By that time, she had worked there for more than 15 years and was making $12.85 per hour in her latest position.

Leading up to her dismissal, Strudwick “was belittled, isolated, humiliated and made to suffer the effects of her disability to the greatest extent possible,” the three-judge panel wrote. “This conduct was deliberate, malicious and designed to force Ms. Strudwick to quit a job she had held for almost 16 years.”

In an email to the Star, ACCE CEO Raymond Berta said his company “has been part of the Mississauga community for 30 years, with a solid track record of performance coupled with an inspiring corporate culture.

“This case occurred several years ago. As a good corporate citizen we have taken corrective action as reported and we have implemented procedures to prevent any reoccurrences.”

Andrew Hoffman, an ACCE general manager at the time, was named in the decision as “the primary participant” in Strudwick’s workplace harassment. He declined to comment on the case when reached by the Star.

Also named was Strudwick’s immediate supervisor, Liz Camilleri, who “featured prominently in (her) despicable treatment” according to the judgment. Camilleri could not be reached by the Star for comment.

Both bosses“tormented (Strudwick) for the specific purpose of making the work environment intolerable,” the court noted in its sharply worded decision, citing evidence presented in court last summer.

This included advising co-workers not to talk to Strudwick and to telephone her with information she needed. Not hearing the phone — thereby missing the information — provided her superiors with an opportunity to chastise her.

Andrew Hoffman, an ACCE general manager at the time, was named in the decision as “the primary participant” in Strudwick’s workplace harassment.
Andrew Hoffman, an ACCE general manager at the time, was named in the decision as “the primary participant” in Strudwick’s workplace harassment.   (ANDREW HOFFMAN / LINKEDIN)  

When Strudwick requested workplace accommodations — including a Canadian Hearing Society assessment, visual fire alarm, a special telephone designed for hearing impaired people, and permission to turn her desk around so she could see people as they approached her — Hoffman denied them, taking the position they were “unnecessary,” the court decision stated.

In an interview, Strudwick told the Star she had mixed emotions about the judgment.

“It doesn’t put this to rest,” she said. “I have to continue to live through this ordeal.

“It was a nightmare, that part of my life, to wake up and dread going to work. But it’s a job, so you put up with it.”

The court noted Strudwick was fired after Hoffman called her a “goddamned fool” over a “stunt” she pulled at a workplace event. The reason for the termination was for “insubordination and wilful misconduct.”

Strudwick’s lawyer, Christopher Du Vernet, told the Star he believes the case puts Ontario employers on notice that disabled workers have to be treated fairly and with respect.

“This is a warning signal for any employer contemplating disregard of employees’ human rights and it will cost them dearly if they do so,” he said. “This is a woman who came in on weekends, came in early, stayed late — her work was her life. And then she’s fired when she became disabled.”

The decision notes the company argued its penalties be deflected onto Hoffman, whose employment was terminated after Berta returned from medical leave. The court rejected this argument, stating the company “cannot escape responsibility” for the actions of its employees.

According to his LinkedIn profile, Hoffman’s employment with ACCE ended in November 2014. A statement of claim obtained by the Star shows he has sued Berta, his former boss, for wrongful dismissal following a “negligent workplace investigation” into allegations that he had harassed someone within his workplace. Hoffman’s lawyer declined to comment but said the case is ongoing.

In response, Berta has counterclaimed for damages. A statement of defence and counterclaim alleges Hoffman stole from the company and mistreated employees. Neither Berta nor his lawyer could be reached by the Star on Wednesday.

For Strudwick, it “took a lot of prayer and support from friends, family, and the Canadian Hearing Society,” but she has since learned how to accept her hearing loss, work with it and move on from her workplace “nightmare.”

Still, she recalled listening to her CD collection as her hearing began to fade so many years ago, hoping in vain it would come back. Earlier this week, she recited a biblical passage from one of her favourite songs, a religious tune titled “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize.”

“At that time the eyes of the blind will be opened and the ears of the deaf will be unstopped.”

If you want to know more or need our help, feel free to contact us at Haywood Hunt for an obligation-free initial consultation.

Workplace Investigation or Workplace Review?

workplace-investigations-toronto

In running a business, there will come a time when you just feel that something isn’t quite right, that some aspects of the organization just don’t make sense, or that an employee is behaving in a suspicious manner. As a business owner or a manager, you might have thought about conducting a workplace review, but then someone suggested that what ought to be done is a workplace investigation. While both aim to get to the root of whatever problem your workplace is experiencing, they are two different things, and we’ll tackle their differences as well as what might be best for your company in this post.

Workplace Review VS Workplace Investigation – The Differences

Generally speaking, workplace reviews are done even without any raised concern or even when you do not suspect that there is a problem. It is usually performed just to ensure that everything is just fine. In contrast to that, workplace investigations are conducted as a response when a concern was brought up by an employee or employees.

Below are some key features of workplace investigations:

  • There is a complaint that warrants a response.
  • The complaint should be specific and filed by a complainant in writing to be investigated upon.
  • The investigator will balance the facts and probabilities based on the complaint and submit a written report to the employer who will then use the report to make a decision.

As for workplace reviews, below are its key features:

  • Reviews are initiated by the employer with or without a complaint being made, because of this, a workplace review has no need for a named complainant or a specific complaint.
  • A consultant will look into the matter and speak to a larger group of employees.
  • Each employee will then have an opportunity to speak to the consultant in private and raise issues that may need to be looked upon if any.
  • Procedural fairness does not apply to workplace reviews because there are no complaints or allegations against particular employees.
  • The consultant simply submits a written report to the employer which summarizes the issues and concerns raised by the employees. This written report will contain notes of the consultant’s discussions with the employees. These notes, along with the consultant’s comments can be used by the employer for decision-making purposes.

Choosing Between a Workplace Review and a Workplace Investigation

Although Haywood Hunt and Associates Inc. undertakes both workplace investigations and workplace reviews, we usually speak first with the business to determine what’s needed.

We suggest a workplace investigation when there is a serious complaint, when a disciplinary action may need to be taken against an accused employee, when the employer senses that something very wrong is going on, when an employer needs a third party point of view to help with decision-making, or when some matters may necessitate legal action.

A workplace review is suggested when the employer simply wants to have an understanding of the workplace’s current state of affairs, any issues and concerns, or just have a feeler or to see if there is a future need for a workplace investigation.

As professional private investigators, we do not recommend that a workplace review and a workplace investigation be carried out at the same time because this can lead to confusion and other issues. If you want to know more or need our help, feel free to contact us at Haywood Hunt for an obligation-free initial consultation.

 

Protecting Your Interests with Corporate Private Investigations

Corporate-Investigations-Toronto

How often have you met someone who might be able to help your business but you were just not sure if doing business with that person would be a smart move? How can you propose to do business with someone who you don’t really know anything about, right?

There are so many ifs and buts in business. Wouldn’t it be great to be able to make decisions knowing that whoever you are dealing with is trustworthy?

Who Needs Corporate Private Investigations?

The best candidates for corporate private investigations are those who have already been taken advantage of. They know what is at stake and how painful it is to be duped, especially after finding out how easy to prevent being taken advantage of is, if only they knew better earlier.

Doing your homework on people is of the utmost importance more so when you’re putting everything on the line just by dealing with them. Remember that in some cases, merely being business partners with unscrupulous individuals or businesses can mean that you or your business can be held responsible from whatever consequence connecting with such persons or companies may bring. One false move can mean losing everything you’ve worked hard for, and yes, even for something that you are not directly involved in.

End point is, whoever you are dealing with, be it just a nanny or a high-stake business deal, you need to know such things as:

  • Any record of bankruptcies
  • Blogs and other written records online
  • Possible criminal history
  • Evictions, if any
  • Foreclosures
  • Finances, especially business related
  • General reputation and/or community standing
  • Judgments
  • Liens
  • Media reports

The Corporate Private Investigation Advantage

The private investigator that you hire should be able to give you a comprehensive spot-on report. He/she should be able to find out if someone is vulnerable and what their vulnerabilities are because human nature dictates that someone will almost always use their vulnerabilities as a motive to do something which they will not normally do or indulge in. For instance, if someone is financially weak, that person may use an opportunity to address that vulnerability even if it means hurting your company or you financially. The person may not be a bad person but due to the perceived needs, was driven to be someone else at that moment.

At Haywood Hunt & Associates Investigation Services, we’ve dealt with small businesses, law firms, real estate firms, and big corporations to help them with their corporate private investigation needs such as doing background checks for new hires, potential business partners, and even possible recurring clients.

Background checks for new hires as well as choosing which employee to promote can help you make better decisions about running your business. As for checking on your possible long-term clients and potential business partners, think of it as an investment or a part of the cost of doing business.

You might be surprised at how much a basic corporate investigation can do for you and your business. Contact us for an obligation-free initial consultation today or whenever you need private investigators in Toronto!